Uri attack: Why New York is next battleground for India and Pakistan



Manhattan in New York is likely to be the next battleground for India and Pakistan as an attack on an army camp in Kashmir’s Uri casts a shadow on the 71st session of the United Nations general assembly. (PTI File Photo)

Manhattan in New York is likely to be the next battleground for India and Pakistan as an attack on an army camp in Kashmir’s Uri casts a shadow on the 71st session of the United Nations general assembly.
Pakistan Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif, who addresses the 193-nation body on Wednesday , plans to focus on the ongoing unrest in Kashmir, where street protests against the government has claimed 86 lives and injured thousands over the past two months.

The Pakistani foreign office says Sharif will “specifically focus on the current situation, particularly the continuing grave violations of human rights” by Indian troops in Kashmir. He will also call on the world community and the UN to “live up to their promise of the right to self-determination” of the Kashmiri people.

Swaraj is leading the Indian UN delegation this year with Prime Minister Narendra Modi deciding to skip this year’s meeting.But when foreign minister Sushma Swaraj addresses the general assembly next Monday, she is expected to give a “befitting response” to Sharif. The attacks on Indian military installations -- in Uri on Sunday and earlier on the morning of January 2 at the Pathankot air base – are likely to figure prominently in her speech.

This will be the second year in a row that Swaraj will counter Pakistan’s charges on Kashmir at the UN general assembly. Though Modi attended last year’s meet, he only addressed the gathering on sustainable development goals.

India and Pakistan often rake up the Kashmir issue at the general assembly but India’s raising of the human rights situation in Pakistan’s Balochistan province, which borders Afghanistan and Iran, has added a new dimension to the sparring.

On September 14, India made a reference to Balochistan at the UN Human Rights Council for the first time.

Afghanistan President Ashraf Ghani is expected to rake up terror in the region but may not name Pakistan. Ghani who was in India on September 14 and 15, will also speak at the UNGA. The India visit yielded a joint statement by Ghani and Modi in which they strongly criticised using terror as a tool for political objectives and providing sanctuaries and sponsorship to terror. Though it made obvious references to Pakistan, the statement did not name the neighbour.

“The two leaders discussed the regional situation and expressed grave concern at continued use of terrorism and violence in the region for achieving political objectives. They agreed that this phenomenon presented the single biggest threat to peace, stability and progress in the region and beyond. Stressing that elimination of all forms of terrorism, without any discrimination, is essential, they called upon the concerned to put an end to all sponsorship, support, safe havens and sanctuaries to terrorists, including for those who target Afghanistan and India,” the statement issued on September 14 said.

Source - Hindustan Times

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